Contact LAC, M-227

Natalie Burgess
Associate Professor, English

Natalie Schiavone earned a BA in English from the University of California, Irvine. During her freshman year at UCI, she submitted an essay about Laura Esquivel’s Like Water for Chocolate that was published in A Student Guide to Writing at UCI 3rd edition. Natalie went on to earn an MA in English Literature and an MFA in Creative Writing from Chapman University. At Chapman, she completed two drafts of a young adult novel that she submitted as her MFA thesis.

Contact LAC, M-222

Sheng-Tai Chang
Professor, English

Sheng-Tai Chang received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Southern California (USC). He also holds an M.A. in English from the University of Calgary in Canada and a second M.A. in Asian Languages and cultures from USC. In addition to writing, his areas of interest include American literature, Chinese literature, and East Asian humanities. He has published scholarly articles and translations of Asian and Asian-American writers, the most recent being Book of Reincarnation, by Hsu Hui-chih (Green Integar 2002).

Contact LAC, M-235

Geneva Chao
Associate Professor, English

Sheng-Tai Chang received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Southern California (USC). He also holds an M.A. in English from the University of Calgary in Canada and a second M.A. in Asian Languages and cultures from USC. In addition to writing, his areas of interest include American literature, Chinese literature, and East Asian humanities. He has published scholarly articles and translations of Asian and Asian-American writers, the most recent being Book of Reincarnation, by Hsu Hui-chih (Green Integar 2002).

Contact LAC, M-235

Berlyn Cobian
Assistant Professor, English

Berlyn Ortega Cobián received her B.A. from UCLA with a degree in American Literature and Culture and a minor in Chicana and Chicano Studies. During her undergraduate years at UCLA, she participated in student government and the Latin American Student Association. She received her M.A. in English from California State University, Fullerton where she was president of Teaching Writing, a graduate student organization, and co-editor and contributor of Pupil, a journal centered on rhetoric and composition pedagogy.

Contact LAC, M-224

Lisa Fitzgerald
Professor, English

Lisa Fitzgerald earned her M.A. in English and TESL Certificate from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. Her teaching is usually focused toward composition and rhetoric, although she has taught classes ranging from developmental writing, critical thinking, and literature; Lisa has a new-found interest in accelerated pedagogy and online teaching, too.

Before joining the English Department at LBCC in 2004, Lisa taught at Orange Coast and Saddleback Colleges, as well as UC Irvine. 

Contact LAC, M-225

Brian Garcia
Assistant Professor, English

Having gotten his start at LBCC, Brian Garcia transferred to Cal State Fullerton and earned his B.A. in English in 2006. He continued his studies at UC Irvine, earning his M.A. in 2009 and his Ph.D. in 2015. His dissertation, titled “‘Everything Was Strange’: Regional Nationalisms and Ironic Identities in Early National American Fiction” examines the ironic treatment of nationalism found in works of fiction written and published in the Postrevolutionary United States.

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Pat McKean
Professor, English

Patrick McKean is the student newspaper adviser, the journalism program coordinator and a journalism professor at Long Beach City College. Long Beach City College students won three top awards at the Fall 2007 Journalism Association of Community Colleges regional conference: general excellence for the Viking Newspaper website, the Viking print edition, and City magazine. He has advised the Viking newspaper for 20years after working as a reporter, copy editor, city editor, news editor and managing editor at professional newspapers for 12 years.

Contact LAC, M-231

Kathryn McMurray
Assistant Professor, English

Kathryn McMurray joined the English Department faculty at Long Beach City College in 2014. She teaches developmental and college-level composition and creative writing courses. Before coming to Long Beach City College, she taught creative writing at CSU Long Beach, composition courses at Orange Coast College, Cerritos College, and Cypress College and also taught for the SummerTIME summer bridge program at USC.

Contact LAC, M-235

David Morse
Assistant Professor, English

David Morse began teaching at Long Beach City College as an hourly instructor in 1991 and returned to the college as a member of the full-time faculty in 1998. He holds a B. A. in English and history from the University of Michigan, a Master’s degree in English from the University of Kansas, and a PhD in English from the University of Southern California.

Contact LAC, M-228

Allison Murray
Professor, English

I earned my Masters Degree in English Literature from California State University, Long Beach, and following 4 years of part time teaching at CSULB and Santa Ana College, I was hired full time at Long Beach City College in 2001.  Long Beach City is one of the most diversified campuses in America, a quality that I thoroughly enjoy because it offers many chances for me to utilize the cultural experiences gained from many years of travel and living abroad.

Contact LAC, M-224

Jennifer Nellis
Professor, English

Jennifer Nellis received a BA in Philosophy from The Ohio State University and an MFA in English and Creative Writing from Mills College. Before joining the English Department at Long Beach City College, she worked as a full-time lecturer at the University of Redlands and part-time at the University of Miami, Moreno Valley College, and Crafton Hills College.

Contact LAC, M-226

Velvet Pearson
Professor, English

Velvet Pearson first taught a college composition course in 1988 for San Diego State University as she was completing an M.A. in English with an emphasis in creative writing. She wrote a two-act play for her master’s thesis and continues to write short fiction. Her commitment to teaching led her to pursue a Ph.D. in English from the University of Southern California, where wrote her dissertation on the influence of works translated from French on 16th-century English culture and literature.

Contact LAC, M-232

Margaret Shannon
Professor, English

I was born and raised in San Pedro, that beautiful town over the bridge. I love the fact that the world backs up into our backyard here in Long Beach and the Port of Los Angeles, and I am very proud to work in one of the most diverse cities in the United States of America. At this critical juncture of the 21st century, where Ray Kurzweil says we will see 20,000 years of change in the next 100 years, I think the harbor area is perfectly slated to create the kinds of leaders and thinkers we will need for sustainable futures across all disciplines.

Contact LAC, M-227

Anthony Starros
Professor, English

Anthony Starros began college as an Art major but finished with a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing in 1999. During his last year of graduate school at CSULB, he won the James I. Murashige Scholarship for his short story “Papou.”  He then worked as a freelance copywriter and began teaching at various colleges around the Long Beach area: Goldenwest College, Cypress College, Orange Coast College, and CSULB.  He accepted an invitation to become full-time faculty at LBCC in 2002.

Contact LAC, M-222

Jeff Wheeler
Professor, English

Jeff Wheeler studied at the University of Southern California where he earned his doctorate by writing the dissertation Palpable Fictions: Popular Rhetoric, Religious Relics, and the English Reformation. His interest in English literature of the Reformation has led to his participation in two seminars on the subject sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

In his English classes, students develop analytical writing skills by thinking through topics ranging from the art and literature of the Renaissance to the study of public space, from plagiarism to folk music.

Contact LAC, M-226

Laura Wheeler
Professor, English

Laura Scavuzzo Wheeler, originally from eastern Pennsylvania, earned her BA from the University of Virginia with a double major in English and Italian. Her MA and PhD in English are both from USC, where she wrote her dissertation on English Protestant impulses toward external marking of clothes, character, language, and faith during the English Renaissance. Before coming to LBCC and while pursuing her doctorate, she taught undergraduates in USC’s Writing Program for seven years and helped train incoming composition instructors.