News & Media

Press Release
A green, glass globe sitting in a forest.

LBCC Receives Clean Energy Award at Green California Summit
LBCC gets recognized for its use of sustainable, green technology throughout the campus

A Long Beach City College project to increase campus energy efficiency was recognized last night, Nov. 28, with the Community College Energy Award at the Green California Summit.

The project refurbished and upgraded cooling systems at both College campuses, resulting in an annual reduction of 713,000-kilowatt hours of electricity and a $90,000 a year in energy saving costs. 

Success Story
A picture of Ayyde Vargas.

L.A. Radio Personality Gets Start at LBCC
Ayydé Vargas makes the morning commute a little sweeter on Big Boy's Neighborhood

One of the familiar voices heard on the Real 92.3’s morning show, Big Boy’s Neighborhood, is that of Ayydé Vargas, who got her start at LBCC’s Radio/TV program.

Vargas attended LBCC from 2013 to 2015. She worked various jobs within the radio industry starting in 2014 at what was then Clear Channel, which is now iHeartMedia. She got her first on-air job in 2015, joining Big Boy’s Neighborhood.

Student Highlights
a group picture with all the LBCC students who won Journalism awards.

Viking News Staff Wins 14 Journalism Awards
The Viking News staff takes home award for General Excellence at Conference

The Viking News print edition took home the award for General Excellence at the Journalism Association of Community Colleges southern section conference held October 14 at Cal State Fullerton.

Long Beach City College garnered a total of 14 wins at the conference in a variety of categories, with Journalism student Lisette Mendoza-Tapia leading the pack with six awards.

The following awards were based on the students’ work during the 2016-17 school year published in the Viking News, print and online editions:

Article
A picture of the Wilcox family.

Five Generations of One Family Attend LBCC

When Loyd V. Wilcox enrolled at Long Beach City College, it was at a time when many veterans had just returned from the war. Back then it was the Korean War, and it was 1955.

“It was a different world,” the 78-year-old recalled.

The campus was predominately men, most of the current buildings hadn’t even been built, and it cost a mere $100 for fees and books for one semester, Wilcox said.

“The most expensive book was a chemistry book that was $7.00,” he remembered.